Category: Philippines

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Fried rice quickie

  Once upon a few minutes ago, I had a pot of cooked brown rice. I know brown rice has many health benefits over white rice and it has more fiber and antioxidants, more vitamins and minerals and it is the healthier option but I am not just used to it. I am not happy . I want steamed white rice. My system is screaming if I’d rather...

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Over a hot bowl of Bulalo

Bulalô is beef shank soup that is a very popular food in the Philippines. This stew is made by boiling beef shanks and marrow bones for hours until the fat melts into the clear broth and produces a light colored soup that is made more flavorful by various seasonings. Vegetables add to the flavor and color to the soup. Popular vegetables that go with bulalo are include corn,...

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Puto Kutsinta

We spell it “kutsinta,” “kuchinta” or “cuchinta.” However you spell it, it still refers to the same member of the Filipino kakanin family. Kutsinta is steamed rice cake with a chewy, sticky, jelly-like consistency, a favorite all around snack or merienda among the list of kakanin or native delicacies in the Philippines. It is frequently paired off with puto, or white steamed rice cake. Its main ingredients are...

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Isaw barbeque, anyone?

Isaw is one of the most popular street foods in the Philippines. If you are not popular with the term, it is the intestines of a pig or chicken turned inside out, cleaned and cleaned again and again, boiled then grilled on sticks over hot live coals. It is very popularly sold on the street sides and roadsides across from school campuses and most especially during late in...

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Kwek-kwek on the quick

It’s called· Kwek kwek or Orange eggs tempura-like street food. A Kwek-Kwek is boiled quail eggs coated with an orange batter and deep-fried until the batter is crispy. It’s also called tokneneng, where chicken eggs are used. In the southern part of the Philippines it is called Kwek-Kwek although chicken eggs are used. Kwek-Kwek is sold in the streets in the Philippines especially late in the afternoon and in...

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Ahh those (siopao) buns

One of the tempting displays at any shelf in a fastfood or restaurant that always catches my attention are those white steamed, meat-filled buns which is a popular food item in the Philippine and Chinese culture. These are called siopao. Siopao literally means “steamed bun” and it the Philippine version of the Cantonese steamed bun called cha siu bao. Siopao is sold in the streets in the Philippines,...

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Crocodile ice cream

After months of seeing photos and reading about the crocodile ice cream from local, national and international publications, I finally had the chance to try this classic dessert with a unique (spelled scary) dessert a while back at the Crocodile Park, one of the most popular attractions in Davao City. I was looking forward to try this crocodile ice cream whose popularity has already spread far and wide,...

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Ginanggang

Ginanggang na saging, guinanggang, or ginang-gang is one of my “most favoritiest” street food in the universe. It is a banana in a bamboo stick grilled over medium hot coals.  This is a snack of my childhood years whenever somebody in the neighborhood installs a portable grill and the smell of ginanggang wafts into the houses. The next day, another neighbor will do the same, and yet another...

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Turon: An unbeatable island favorite

THEY come in different lengths, diameters and different variations. They are being prepared by experts and amateurs, but whatever way they are prepared, they satisfy the sweet cravings of a big number of the population. Turon is sliced  bananas with strips of jackfruit, wrapped in spring roll wrapper, dipped in brown sugar then fried. it is one of the bestselling favorites on island. Also called banana fritters, this...

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Pastil: budget meal on a banana leaf

PASTIL was one of the first food items that I looked for when I finally got back to Davao City last month, after over six years of being away. Pastil is one of the most popular delicacies in Maguindanao and Cotabato, particularly at the public market area and at small roadside restaurants. It is not that common in Davao City but I remembered a couple of food stalls...