Spicy Korean dinner at Miah’s

hot fried chicken wings

THE bright red and yellow billboard announcing Miah’s on Middle Road a few meters away from Fresh Market caught our attention as we were scouting for a place to eat late on Friday evening.

The restaurant was deserted but when we came in, a woman in apron appeared and waved us to a table. She disappeared and a young Chinese girl gave us a menu. We asked for two more because it was already running late and we can’t spend the whole night waiting for each one to finish.

Conversation was almost impossible. The girl tried her best to speak English and understand us, while we, who don’t speak Chinese or Korean, tried our best to translate what we wanted to order. I almost lost my patience when she had to make a trip to the kitchen each time we asked her about a certain dish from the menu to check if they had it.

I asked for the steamed yellow fish and hoped they had it. It took another three minutes of asking and rephrasing my question before the wait staff understood and went to the kitchen to ask if they had it. I also ordered chopped steaks, which required another trip to the kitchen.

steamed fish

My buddies ordered Bulgogi and a serving of hot chicken wings. The girl served us four side dishes which we munched on as we waited for our orders.

Despite the language barrier and the numerous trips to the kitchen, the food was good. My steamed yellow fish came in a spicy sauce that blended with the mixed flavors of spices and sesame seeds.

Our meal was almost finished, with buddy Jeanette digging into my steamed fish and Arnold’s Bulgogi while she waited for her hot wings.

Finally, when she only had one spoonful of rice left, her order came — 12 crispy fried chicken wings neatly arranged on a platter and sprinkled with sesame seeds on top.

Looking at it, I was apprehensive but I picked up one and took a bite. I went rigid as my tongue went from shock to numb to burning hot. The menu should have read “very hot or super hot wings.” Our tolerance to spicy foods is somewhat higher but the hot wings went beyond out taste bud’s level of endurance. Thankfully, I found a bar of Hershey’s chocolate in my bag which we munched on to ease the burning sensation in our mouths. If you order hot wings from Miah’s Restaurant menu, maybe you should tell the wait staff not to make it super hot if you cannot tolerate too spicy food.

You can also check out other dishes such as the Korean style chicken galbi which the girl said is the restaurant’s specialty, and other chicken, beef and pork dishes, seafood and fish delights, steamed food, and pancake recipes. You can also order meal sets priced from $7 to $10 such as stone pot bibimbap or mixed rice with vegetables, noodles, steamed dumplings, and more. Stew or soup range from $7 to $30 per order.
If you’re not that hungry, you can go for any of the sandwiches and burgers or salads from $2 to $6. Beverages are from $2 to $6 such as Oolong tea, beer, Soju, milk and fruit juices.

Miah’s is planning to open an internet café inside the restaurant very soon. The place has rooms which diners can use for special conferences or private dinners.

Only cash is accepted for now. Miah’s is open from 5 p.m. to 3 a.m. every day. For reservations or inquiries, call 235-6116. This article was first published HERE

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